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The conference presented and discussed the role of negotiation, mediation and conciliation in evidence-based cases of water diplomacy. Experts shared perspectives and solutions focused on

  • creating a better understanding water diplomacy capabilities, particularly among water resource specialists and diplomats
  • initiating an international hub of experts to better resolve water related conflicts
  • formulating an agenda on water diplomacy capability development

Participants included water experts, diplomats, policymakers as well as political leaders who deal with water-related disputes at various levels; and a cariety of organizations (governments, international organizations, NGOs), and leading scientists from various disciplines. More info >>

For those of you who couldn't make it to the conference, here is a session-by-session account of the discussions:

 

Day 1: November 14

Welcome Address: Deputy Mayor Rabin Baldewsingh, The Hague’s Alderman for Public Health, Sustainability, Media and Municipal Organization

 

Water diplomacy from a hands-on perspective: David Grey, University of Oxford

 

Challenges to water security now and in 2050 – A scientific outlook: Pavel Kabat, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
 
 
 
A negotiated approach to managing complex water issues: Shafiq Islam, Tufts University, USA

 

Mediation as a tool for solving water-related disputes: Aaron Wolf, Oregon State University, USA

 

Arbitration and legal processes regarding water-related disputes: 
Judge Kenneth Keith, International Court of Justice
 
 
 
Multilevel water diplomacy: Mark Smith, Director - IUCN Global Water Program

 

Introduction to working groups:

 

Day 2: November 15

Outcomes and next steps, Working Group 1: Making cooperation work - A legal, institutional and political perspective

 

Outcomes and next steps, Working Group 2: Water diplomacy and the resource – System analytical approaches for sharing international waters

 

Outcomes and next steps, Working Group 3: Multilevel Water Diplomacy – Creating the links

 

Closing Session

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Recording produced by Stefan Flos: http://stefanflos.nl/)

 

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